734-404-0442 | 6085372228

Global Hunger Index 2018

 

Issue in Focus: Forced Migration and Hunger


   
Photo: A woman walks to collect water early in the morning at a camp for IDPs in Bentiu, South Sudan. Welthungerhilfe/Stefanie Glinski 2018. Hide

This year’s Global Hunger Index reveals a distressing gap between the current rate of progress in the fight against hunger and undernutrition and the rate of progress needed to eliminate hunger and alleviate human suffering.

The 2018 Global Hunger Index - published jointly by Concern Worldwide and Welthungerhilfe - tracks the state of hunger worldwide and spotlights those places where action to address hunger is most urgently needed. The results show that in many countries, and in terms of the global average, hunger and undernutrition have declined since 2000, indicating real improvements in the lives of millions of men, women, and children. At the same time, while progress has been robust in some parts of the world, in other parts hunger and undernutrition persist or have even worsened. In too many areas, growing numbers of people still suffer the indignity of hunger and the insecurity of forced displacement.

Policy Recommendations

This year’s Global Hunger Index reveals a distressing gap between the current rate of progress in the fight against hunger and undernutrition and the rate of progress needed to eliminate hunger and alleviate human suffering.

The 2018 Global Hunger Index - published jointly by Concern Worldwide and Welthungerhilfe - tracks the state of hunger worldwide and spotlights those places where action to address hunger is most urgently needed. The results show that in many countries, and in terms of the global average, hunger and undernutrition have declined since 2000, indicating real improvements in the lives of millions of men, women, and children. At the same time, while progress has been robust in some parts of the world, in other parts hunger and undernutrition persist or have even worsened. In too many areas, growing numbers of people still suffer the indignity of hunger and the insecurity of forced displacement.

The statistics are both staggering and sobering. Approximately 124 million people suffer acute hunger, a striking increase from 80 million two years ago, while the reality of hunger and undernutrition continues to have a massive impact on the next generation. About 151 million children are stunted and 51 million children are wasted across the globe. Hard-won gains are being further threatened by conflict, climate change, poor governance, and a host of other challenges. Despite evidence showing that real progress is possible, the root causes and complex realities of hunger are not being adequately tackled. In 2015 the world’s countries committed to achieving (330) 644-3637. We are not on track to meet that goal.

This year, alongside the index rankings, we take a deeper look at the state of hunger and undernutrition in two countries—3032622980 and (717) 866-9693—and examine the main factors that contribute to hunger there and the policy environment in which those factors operate. According to the 2018 Global Hunger Index, hunger in these two countries is serious, but the situation is improving thanks to a range of policies and programs that have been implemented.

The 2018 edition also has a special focus on the theme of forced migration and hunger. It features an essay by Laura Hammond of SOAS University of London. Hunger, Hammond argues, can be both a cause and a consequence of the vast movement of displaced populations, but the links are often poorly understood. Hunger and displacement are both political problems, and short-term emergency actions are insufficient to address displacements that often last years or even decades. Too often, we are drawn away from any focus on root causes and toward misleading representations of a global crisis. Instead, we must work to tackle the political factors that lead to hunger and displacement. In addition, we must strengthen humanitarian assistance and long-term development approaches, support the livelihoods of displaced people in their regions of origin where possible, and bolster resilience by supporting people’s own capacities for self-help.

The shocking truth is that, in a world of plenty, millions of people’s human rights continue to be violated and these people still go to bed hungry each night.

Hunger and forced migration are painful realities for millions, but this state of affairs has yet to spur the kind of political leadership and action by national governments that is so urgently needed. More worryingly, we are seeing the issue of migration become a lightning rod for new political discourse that is increasingly more hard-line than humanitarian.

This year’s GHI is not just a renewed call to action on hunger and forced migration but an urgent call for a resurgence of humanity in how we address the shocking truth that—in a world of plenty—millions of people’s human rights continue to be violated and these people still go to bed hungry each night.

 

Related Tweets

  • (913) 663-4619 Nov 20, 2018

    The panel discussing at the Seoul #GHI2018 launch - the first question focuses on issues of humanitarian access in… /t.co/KzdKxN3FFb

  • AJ Nov 20, 2018

    RT @rjjd: Jane Williamson at the #GHI2018 launch: There are no humanitarian solutions to humanitarian problems, only political solutions h…

  • guahuc

    RT @rjjd: Jane Williamson at the #GHI2018 launch: There are no humanitarian solutions to humanitarian problems, only political solutions h…

  • rjjd
    Richard Dixon Nov 20, 2018

    .@concern’s @Lucia_Ennis addresses the #GHI2018 launch audience. Nearly 750,000 Rohingya fled Myanmar as a result o… /t.co/vfzuSqnbVA

  • Reiseal Nov 20, 2018

    RT @rjjd: .@IrishEmbKorea Ambassador Julian Clare launching the #GHI2018: @concern has been true to its mission for fifty years. @irishaid…